Before and After OSHA

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was established by Congress under the Occupational Safety and Health Act on April 28, 1971.  Its main purpose is to, “assure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women by setting and enforcing standards and by providing training, outreach, education and assistance”.  And thus far, statistics show they have done a great job of doing so.

Since its formation, OSHA has done wonders for worker safety and accident control around the nation.  Since 1972, worker injuries and illnesses are down from 10.9 incidents per 100 workers, to 3.3 per 100.  Worker deaths are down from an average of 38 deaths a day in 1970 to 12 a day in 2013.  In other words, workplace death rates have been reduced by over 66% and injury/illness rates have declined by 67%.  All of this has been achieved, while U.S. employment has almost doubled.

Before the implementation of OSHA, there was little safety regulation in the workplace.  America’s mass producing mentality called for much machinery work, which in turn heightened the risk for many American employees.  However, nothing was done to ensure their well-being.  In fact, for most employers, it was easier and less expensive to replace a dead or injured worker than it was to introduce safety measures.

Fortunately, the workplace has progressed and OSHA’s aim to provide employees with an environment free of hazards like toxic chemical exposure, excessive noise levels, mechanical dangers, heat or cold stress, or unsanitary conditions has been effective.  More information about OSHA and their work can be found at https://www.osha.gov/.  Like OSHA, Healthcare Waste Management is committed to reducing risk every day in the medical waste disposal industry with our Eco-friendly equipment and efficient routing system.  Let us do the same for you.  www.hwmusa.com.